Ross Reynolds | KUOW News and Information

Ross Reynolds

Executive Producer of Community Engagement

Year started with KUOW: 1987

Ross creates community conversations (like the Ask A events) that supplement and complement KUOW's on-air and on-line services. He produces the occasional arts and news feature. He was co-host of KUOW’s daily news magazine The Record September 2013 to November 2015. Before that he hosted The Conversation, KUOW's award–winning daily news–talk program from 2000 to 2013 and KUOW's Seattle Afternoon from 1988 to 1992.

Ross came to KUOW in 1987 as news director and in 1992 became program director. As program director, he changed the station's format from classical/news to news and yet more news. He led  KUOW's coverage of the World Trade Organization protests in 1999 won a National Headliner First Place Award for Coverage of a Live Event.

Along the way, Ross hosted  the award–winning regional newsmagazine Northwest Journal that aired in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska; and a weekly public television interview program on KCTS Seattle called Upon Reflection. He is a frequent moderator for political debates and discussions in the Seattle community.

Ross has been an East-West Center media fellow in the Kingdom of Tonga, an  East-West Center Jefferson Fellow in Tokyo,  South Korea and Malaysia and a RIAS Berlin Visiting American Journalist in Berlin, Brussels, Prague, Dresden. In 2011, Ross graduated from the University of Washington with a master's degree in digital media from the School of Communication.

His pre-KUOW career included seven years as news director at community radio station KBOO in Portland, five years as news and public affairs director at WCUW in Worcester, Massachusetts, two years as music editor of Worcester Magazine, and short stints as fill-in news director at KMXT Kodiak, Alaska, and as a reporter at the Pacifica National News Service, Washington, DC, bureau. Ross has a cameo role in the documentary film "Manufacturing Consent," an intellectual biography of Noam Chomsky.

Ways to Connect

A Portland Police Bureau officer controlling the crowd at a protest on Saturday, August 4th, 2018.
OPB Photo/Ericka Cruz Guevarra

The sound of flashbangs and smoke grenades echoed through the streets of downtown Portland Saturday during a protest held by the Proud Boys and Patriot Prayer. The groups clashed with members of Antifa, who were primarily on the receiving end of police force.


Graves
Flickr Photo/Noah Stride (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/XeDZdw

Ross Reynolds talks to Zen Buddhist and palliative-care nurse Sallie Tisdale, about death, grieving, and her new book, "Advice For Future Corpses: A Practical Perspective on Death and Dying."

KUOW Photo/Brie Ripley

Five women have accused Capitol Hill restauranteur and political activist David Meinert of sexual misconduct, including rape. Meinert has admitted to being a jerk to women and being “handsy,” but insists he’s not a rapist.

Sail Like a Girl heads off into the sunset.
Photo by Katrina Zoë Norbom.

It's an 1,110 mile drive from Port Townsend up to Ketchikan, Alaska.

There is a way to shave 350 miles off the trip, but there's a catch: You have to sail.


Carmen Best, center, smiles while standing with her husband, left, and Seattle mayor Jenny Durkan, right, during a press conference on Tuesday, July 17, 2018, at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Ross Reynolds talks to Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan and Interim Police Chief Carmen Best on the recent naming of Best to permanently take the position. She still needs to be confirmed by the Seattle City Council.

A book spoted on a log in English Bay
Flickr Photo/Kyle Pearce (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/oakKcD

Summer. 

When the days are long and vacations are taken.

A time to pull out the books that give you pleasure and let you escape from the world.

The books you read during the summer do not have to be “easy reads” or “fluffy,” “light,” or “frothy.” They should be something you get lost in while at the beach or on a flight or long car ride.

Academic researchers will soon have access to a vast amount of Facebook's user data.
Flickr Photo/Andrew Feinberg (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4xvBtj

Facebook is sharing its user data with an external research group, which will mine it for details about how people use the site.

Sound familiar?


School buses
Flickr Photo/JohnPickenPhoto (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/a2MPnK

Ross Reynolds talks to Rob Glaser, founder of RealNetworks, about the company's software called SAFR, that offers free facial recognition software to schools. It's currently being piloted at the University Child Development School.

Carmen Best smiles during a press conference on Tuesday, July 17, 2018, at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle has a new police chief. Carmen Best has served in the Seattle Police Department for over 25 years. She will be the first African American woman to lead the department. We talk to Lisa Daugaard, Director of the Public Defender Association and Seattle City Council member Lorena Gonzalez about the decision and what's next for the Seattle Police Department. 

Twelve million dollars: That's how much Washington state spent to send 16 patients with traumatic brain injuries to a rehabilitation center in Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

Unbearable heat.
Flickr Photo/bark (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8pMQHn

The state's climatologist Nick Bond joins Ross Reynolds to talk about the record-breaking heat over the weekend and what we can expect this summer.

Bond says the biggest systematic change is that the nighttime temperatures have gone up, with low temperatures in the 60s rather than the 50s.

President Donald Trump
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

The meeting between President Trump and President Vladimir Putin of Russia has drawn bipartisan criticism. Ross Reynolds talks to our panel about what Trump's refusal to condemn Russian actions means and the timing of the indictments of the 12 Russian military officers.

KUOW/Brie Ripley

It's known as the miracle compound: Omega-3s are an amazing fat that can helps lower blood pressure, help with heart disease, and can strengthen brain function.

We consume omega-3s in fish and increasingly in supplements made from marine creatures. But there may be more to the story of those magic fish oil pills. Are they as environmentally sustainable or as healthy as we thought?

Flickr Photo/Howard Ignatius (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nZ4Mz1

In honor of the summer solstice, we asked listeners about their favorite summer songs. You came through with the nostalgic, the playful, and some truly excellent 80s throwbacks. 


Hydroplane racer and stunt pilot Mira Slovak drives the Miss Bardahl.
Flickr Photo/Insomnia Cured Here (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/3aZ9C1

"In America, freedom is like air," said Czech daredevil Mira Slovak. That air was his element - he used it for work, for play, and to make his escape across the Iron Curtain to freedom.


Washington Governor Jay Inslee.
Facebook Photo/Governor Jay Inslee

Governor Jay Inslee announced that Washington state is suing the Trump Administration over the family separation policy. Ross Reynolds asked him what that means, when the policy seems to be changing daily.

"We have demonstrated time and time again that this rogue and chaotic administration needs to have the semblance of order and fairness and equity that is given to us by the protection of the judicial system," said Governor Inslee, referring to the state's other lawsuits.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle is a growing city. Roads have gotten more congested, trails more crowded and housing prices have been on a steady climb up.  So what brings people into the city, and once they are here, why do they stay? 

Filmmaker, photographer, and King County Metro Transit bus driver Nathan Vass.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Nathan Vass is an 11-year veteran of King County Metro Transit - no small feat at 32. Even more impressive is his ability to stay engaged and delighted by his job over all those years. He's been called 'the only happy bus driver in Seattle', which he's quick to dispute on behalf of other equally cheerful colleagues. But he's pretty stoked to be here.


Kim Il-sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea
Flickr Photo/Gabriel Britto (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2KU1mYZ

Ross Reynolds talks to Don Hellmann, professor emeritus at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington, about what happens now that President Trump has pulled out of the June summit with North Korea. The move comes after North Korea issued a statement emphasizing their own arsenal and calling Vice President Mike Pence a "political dummy."

Lisa Wang

One reason we’re seeing such polarization in American society is that we’re not talking to each other. We’re wrapped up in our own cocoons and echo chambers.

In an effort to combat this, KUOW has  launched a series of person-to-person conversation events we call 'Ask A __.'

FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russian Intelligence Activities.
AP Photo/Cliff Owen

Ross Reynolds talks with Kathy Loedler, a 23-year veteran of the FBI and now CEO of the Rampart Group, and Carolyn Woodbury, former supervisory special agent in Seattle who spent more than 20 years with the FBI. They discuss former FBI Director James Comey's book tour and what it means for the FBI's reputation.

Seattle lost a civil rights icon this weekend.

The Reverend Dr. Samuel B. McKinney died Saturday. He was 91. 

KUOW's Marcie Sillman spoke with arts advocate and former Seattle Arts Commission chair, Vivian Phillips, who knew McKinney personally about his life and work. 

The Seahawks' field logo, in happier times.
Flickr Photo/sunshine.patchoulli (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/9oYiX

“Well. That was a, uh … let me say it this way, a tremendous showing by the Rams.”

Seattle skyline
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds talks to Zaki Hamid, a program director for Humanities Washington, about why he calls Seattle home and what has kept him here. And we  take calls from listeners who share their stories of how they make it work in the changing region. 

KUOW PHOTO/Megan Farmer

The mayoral race in Seattle is heating up. King County Democrats have endorsed Cary Moon, and so has today’s panelist, former mayor Mike McGinn. Labor unions have come out in support Jenny Durkan. What’s the significance of this latest round of endorsements?

The City of Seattle is going to spend at least a quarter of million dollars defending legal attacks against the high earner income tax passed by City Council on a 9-0 vote. Is it common for a local or state government agency to pass laws they know they need to spend money to defend in court?

Is Seattle becoming Amazonia? And because we're still not sick of talking about the eclipse, we ask the panel where they watched the celestial show.

Listen to the show on Fridays at noon and join the conversation on Twitter using #KUOWwir.

Flickr/Daniella Urdinlaiz (CC BY 2.0)

Comedian George Carlin is funny and serious as he talks about white privilege, things he could do without, and why he dislikes the label Native American. 

"They're not natives, they emigrated here. They came from Asia. And putting the word American on them is the supreme insult. After you steal their cultures, put them on the worst land possible, give them blankets with smallpox then turn around and give your name. It's repulsive." 

Carlin was interviewed by KUOW's Steve Scher on the occasion of publishing his book "Brain Droppings." 

Gary Brose is a Republican running for mayor in Seattle.
Courtesy of Gary Brose

Gary Brose, the 65-year-old Republican candidate for Seattle mayor laughs at the recent Fox News host assertion that Seattle is a socialist hellhole. “They’re trying for ratings there, I think.”

https://www.google.com/search?q=ruth+brown&safe=off&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiH9KnPjc3UAhUC62MKHbB6BloQiR4IiQE&biw=1536&bih=735#imgrc=2TEPzrCH3me5HM:

Ruth Brown (1928-2006) was known as the queen of R&B. She had a series of hit songs for Atlantic Records in the 1950s, such as "So Long", "Teardrops from My Eyes" and "(Mama) He Treats Your Daughter Mean." Atlantic became known as "the house that Ruth built" (alluding to the popular nickname for the old Yankee Stadium).

Between 1949 and 1955, her records stayed on the R&B chart for a total of 149 weeks, with sixteen in the top 10, including five number-one hits.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Vonnegut#/media/File:Kurt_Vonnegut_1972.jpg

 

Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007) was grim about the future in a hilarious way.

William P. Gottlieb/Ira and Leonore S. Gershwin Fund Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress
William P. Gottlieb/Ira and Leonore S. Gershwin Fund Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress

At the time of this interview Lionel Hampton (1908 – 2002), vibraphonist, band leader and composer, had been a working musician for 62 years when he spoke with Ross Reynolds.

Hampton introduced the vibraphone as a jazz instrument, wrote jazz standards (“Flying Home”), performed with jazz greats Louie Armstrong, Benny Goodman, Gene Krupa , Duke Ellington, Dizzie Gillespie, and discovered Dinah Washington and Joe Williams.  He also recruited Seattleites Quincy Jones and Ernestine Anderson for his bands. 

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