The Record | KUOW News and Information

The Record

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1:00 p.m.

Daily conversations about ideas that matter to Seattle and the Puget Sound region. Hosted by Bill Radke.

What's your story? Tell us. Our email address is record@kuow.org.

Subscribe to The Record podcast in iTunes or by searching The Record in your podcast aggregator.

Ways to Connect

FILE: Then-Deputy Chief Carmen Best smiles during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall. Best will be interim Seattle Police Chief.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke speaks with Crosscut's City Reporter David Kroman about the surprise reversal that placed Carmen Best back in as a finalist for Seattle's Chief of Police. She was initially not included among the finalist but that changed when one of the finalist, Cameron McLay, withdrew his application. McLay has agreed to take a different job with the Seattle Police Department assisting on reform efforts.

Key Arena is home court for Sue Bird, a 9 time WNBA All-Star
Seattle Storm

On Sunday night, Seattle Storm point guard Sue Bird smashed through the team's all-time leading scorer record. She put up 21 points against the Mystics. She's also the all-time assist leader for the WNBA. Bird spoke to Bill Radke about setting the new record and why she prefers making an assist to scoring a basket.

Hannah Gadsby in Nanette
Courtesy of Netflix/Ben King

Bill Radke talks about the Netflix stand-up comedy special, "Nanette," in which comic Hannah Gadsby says she's leaving comedy. "I built a career out of self-depreciation," she says, "And I don't want to do that anymore." We talk about comedy as resistance.

A clutch of barnacles waits to allure you this summer.
Flickr Photo/NOAA Photo Library (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/fUQNZx

Welcome to the beginning of Seattle summer! Don't worry if you didn't make trail and camping reservations months ago - Seattle has a lot to offer procrastinators.


Fuca Pillar at Cape Flattery, the northwest extremity of the Olympic Peninsula. Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Washington.
Flickr Photo/NOAA Photo Library (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8D9zXL

Bill Radke talks to Jenny Waddell, research coordinator at the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. She was on the exploration ship that went hunting for a meteorite on Monday. The team livestreamed the mission. It was the first ever to search for a meteorite in the ocean.

Jenny Durkan
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan joins Bill Radke in studio to answer listener questions. We talk about the education levy on the ballot this November, next year's budget, the streetcar delay, her fondness for the U.S. Navy Blue Angels, and the city's homelessness crisis.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Summer in the Pacific Northwest is ten months of planning followed by two months of all-out sprint. Passes for trails and campsites go fast. If you weren't organized enough to get yours in advance, don't despair! You don't have to stay at home in your backyard - although that's a great option too, says The Evergrey's Ana Sofia Knauf. 


Terrance Hayes.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

"In a second I'll tell you how little writing rescues." That promise, from the opening poem of Terrance Hayes' "American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin", is only partially kept. 

The poems in the book are in constant motion. They shuttle back and forth between Emmett Till and Maxine Waters, slavery and hip hop, the nation's future and the past it can't bear to look at. 

Mintwab Zemeadim, Rohena Khan, and Kamari Bright.
KUOW Photo/Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

Now more than ever, many people's relationship with America is... complicated.

Three Seattle artists want to hear more about your relationship status with America. How would you describe it to your friends? (How do you describe it to yourself?)

How do you sing America?

Jul 3, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Tomorrow is the nation's 242nd birthday. The 4th of July brings citizenship ceremonies and fireworks displays. But this year it will also bring protests against the country's treatment of immigrants. Many people are now having a deeper conversation about what it means to be American. 

Maria Cantwell
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Justice Anthony Kennedy is set to retire at the end of July. President Trump is expected to name his nominee next week, but Senator Maria Cantwell said the process shouldn't be rushed.

Canada flag American flag
Flickr Photo/Bruno Casonato (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/c1MdB

Bill Radke talks to Catherine Cullen, senior reporter covering politics and Parliment Hill in Ottawa for the CBC about the new tariffs Canada has put on U.S. products like steel, aluminum and strawberry jam. 

An illustration from a Scout.ai story.
Illustration by Cody Fitzgerald

Rumors of flying cars may have been greatly exaggerated, but the future is changing faster than our brains can keep up. Berit Anderson, CEO of Scout.ai, is trying to change that with a very ancient technology: stories.


Protesters occupy the sidewalk and into the street during the Solidarity Day protest outside of the Federal Detention Center in SeaTac.
Daniel Berman for KUOW

Bill Radke talks to our panelists about the 'Familes Belong Together' protests across the country over the weekend, including the rally at the SeaTac Federal Detention Center. We also discuss what the end of the Sasquatch music festival means for the city's arts scene, and if the City of Seattle's app should be used to report homeless encampments.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

How can sci-fi prepare businesses and governments for the future? Berit Anderson, CEO of Scout.ai, along with the company's advisors, Brenda Cooper and Ramez Naam, tell Bill Radke stories that help us understand how the world is changing and how to keep up.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Why are women underrepresented in computer science? Is is systemic forces? Or personal preference? We speak to a University of Washington lecturer who says it's the latter, and the executive director of Ada Academy who says it's the former.

Display with system code.
Flickr Photo/Yuri Samoilov (CC BY 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2N9a7jN

Bill Radke talks to Stuart Reges, principal lecturer at the University of Washington's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science about his essay, "Why Women Don't Code," saying women are underrepresented in computer science because of personal preferences. We're also joined by Nicole Buchanan, executive director of Ada Developers Academy.

In our conversation, Reges and Buchanan discuss what they see as the factors that do or do not lead women to go into computer science and tech, and the work they're both doing to bring women into the field and ensure they're supported.

File photo of the Supreme Court.
Flickr Photo/Mark Fischer

In a 5-4 ruling the Supreme Court decided that public sector workers don't have to pay a so-called "fair share fee" to the unions that represent them.

One of these sustainable straws might be in your future.
KUOW Photo/Brie Ripley

Nothing is more satisfying than the sweet sound of a straw - a pointy, plastic straw - piercing the seal on a tall cup of bubble tea. But after this weekend, that sound might be harder to come by. Seattle's ban on single use plastics goes into effect on July 1st.

Why the prohibition? How will it be implemented? And most importantly: what about the tea?? Kevin Kelly, general manager of Recology Cleanscapes in Georgetown, came by to help Bill Radke and producer Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong cope with change.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

President Trump is loud. Why is former President Obama quiet? Bill Radke put that question and others to Ben Rhodes, former Obama adviser and speechwriter. Rhodes' new book about his time in the previous administration is called "The World As It Is."


Eula Scott Bynoe and Jeannie Yandel
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

How much money do you make?

Turn and tell a coworker.

If you just cringed, you're like a lot of Americans when it comes to talking about salary at work. But that attitude is hurting us - especially women. KUOW's new podcast, Battle Tactics for Your Sexist Workplace, wants that to change.


FILE: Therese Macisaac of Seattle joins a protest against the travel ban outside the U.S. District Court of Appeals in Seattle in 2017.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Trump’s latest travel ban that barred people entering the U.S. from five majority Muslim countries as well as North Korea and Venezuela.

In the 5-4 decision, the majority opinion stated that the ban fell "squarely within the scope of Presidential authority.”

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

The Supreme Court today upheld the Trump Administration travel ban, which primarily targets people from majority Muslim countries. AP reporter Mark Sherman put the decision into modern-day context. Then Bill Radke spoke to two people: one with memories of the past and one who fears for the future. 

Ichiro Suzuki, special assistant to the chairman of the Seattle Mariners, donned a Bobby Valentine-style disguise and sneaked into the Seattle dugout to watch a bit of the action at Yankee Stadium.
AP Photo/Bill Kostroun

Ichiro Suzuki, the Carmen Sandiego of the Mariners, was spotted last week in the Seattle dugout serving a Super Mario Bros. inspired lewk. Fooling no one, the disguise raised more questions than it answered.


A young tyke uses a VR headset.
FLICKR PHOTO/Andri Koolme (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/FrZYUC

Bill Radke talks with Wired's Peter Rubin, author of "Future Presence: How Virtual Reality is Changing Human Connection, Intimacy, and the Limits of Ordinary Life."

Flickr Photo/SP8254 (CC BY-NC-ND)

In light of this month’s finding in favor of the Colorado baker who refused to make a cake for a same-sex wedding, Supreme Court watchers anticipated a similar decision in the case of Arlene’s Flowers in Richland.

That expectation was dashed, as the court declined to rule on the case. Instead, they sent it back to the Washington State Supreme Court to reconsider.

Disguise-ghazi comes to a dugout near you

Jun 25, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

The Supreme Court may have taken the cake earlier this month, but they won’t be arranging the flowers. This morning, the court declined to rule on the lawsuit against Arlene’s Flowers over their refusal to create arrangements for a same-sex wedding. The New York Times’ Adam Liptak explains why.

The OUT@Comcast team members and friends marching in the 2017 Seattle Pride Parade, by Stephen Wong.
Flickr Photo/Comcast Washington State (CC BY 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2twwHdW

Bill Radke looks at the controversy over the restaurant that asked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to leave. We also talk about the commercialization of Seattle's Pride Parade. Should the event go back to its political roots?

Flickr Photo/Howard Ignatius (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nZ4Mz1

In honor of the summer solstice, we asked listeners about their favorite summer songs. You came through with the nostalgic, the playful, and some truly excellent 80s throwbacks. 


Hydroplane racer and stunt pilot Mira Slovak drives the Miss Bardahl.
Flickr Photo/Insomnia Cured Here (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/3aZ9C1

"In America, freedom is like air," said Czech daredevil Mira Slovak. That air was his element - he used it for work, for play, and to make his escape across the Iron Curtain to freedom.


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