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conservation

Washington grapples with orca recovery plan

Aug 7, 2018
Photo Courtesy of Taylor Shedd of Soundwatch

Bill Radke talks to Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes and Dr. Deborah Giles, whale research biologist for the  University of Washington's Center for Conservation Biology about a new task force led by Washington's Governor Jay Inslee. The task force hopes to find a way to save orcas from extinction. 

Martin Ramirez says the Woodland Park Zoo is planning to allow visitors to touch the two rhinos.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

It seems just about everyone's moving to Seattle these days, and now that includes rhinoceri.

Two baby rhinos, named Taj and Glenn, are now permanent residents at Woodland Park Zoo.


Larches, a staple of the North Cascades, are shown on the Pacifc Crest Trail near Cutthroat Pass.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The North Cascades National Park turns 50 years old this year.

It's a popular place to camp and hike now, but a new book about the park's history says it got off to a rocky start. 


The Trump administration wants to slash the federal government’s biggest source of funds for conservation on private land. Here's what you need to know:

1. That funding is found in a surprising place: the Farm Bill.

Nationally, Farm Bill programs conserve about 50 million acres of land. For scale, that's more than half the entire acreage of the National Park system.

There’s a whole suite of conservation programs in the Farm Bill, but most of them do one of two things.

Keiko Green reads 'the garden at higo' at Ampersand Live
Courtesy of Forterra/Jen Au

Once a year Ampersand magazine hosts an evening of storytelling, poetry and performance that reflects upon the unique nature of life in the Northwest. The magazine comes under the umbrella of Forterra, an organization committed to making our lives here sustainable.

The Jane Goodall Institute/Michael Neugebauer

Dr. Jane Goodall hasn’t been in one place for more than three weeks since October 1986. That’s when she says she went from being a scientist to an activist for the welfare of wild and captive chimpanzees. She now travels nearly 300 days a year.

A sow with two two-year old cubs.
FLICKR PHOTO/Gregory 'Slobirdr' Smith (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ozF67K

There are fewer than 10 grizzly bears in the North Cascades, according to government estimates. U.S. Fish and Wildlife and the National Parks Service has a plan to bring them back. There are four possible options with choices range from do nothing at all to capturing bears from surrounding areas and placing them here in Washington.

For lovers of fatty tuna belly, canned albacore and swordfish kebabs, here's a question: Would you be willing to give them up for several years so that you could eat them perhaps for the rest of your life?

If a new proposal to ban fishing on the open ocean were to fly, that's essentially what we might be faced with. It's an idea that might help restore the populations of several rapidly disappearing fish – like tuna, swordfish and marlin — that we, and future generations, might like to continue to have as a food source.

Hundreds of thousands of marine mammals are injured or killed every year by fishermen around the world. And because most seafood in the U.S. is imported, that means our fish isn't as dolphin-friendly as you might expect.

Under pressure from conservation groups, federal regulators are preparing to tighten import standards to better protect marine mammals.

There was a time, more than 40 years ago, when U.S. fishermen killed millions of dolphins while fishing for tuna. After a public backlash, fishermen figured out how to minimize that so-called bycatch.

Flickr Photo/Washington State Department of Natural Resources

 

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources, the Department of Fish and Wildlife and Forterra announced yesterday the purchase of more than 50,000 acres in the headwaters of the Yakima Basin watershed.

It will be designated as the Teanaway Community Forest. That’s big. How big? Think 38,000 football fields. It’s the state’s largest land acquisition in 45 years. Ross Reynolds spoke to Washington State Lands Commissioner Peter Goldmark as he headed from Olympia to Teanaway and asked him about the future of this now state-run land.  

Flickr Photo/Madison Guy

Violence Erupts In Egypt
Egyptian troops moved into Cairo to break up the anti-government protests today. The country has declared a state of emergency as violence escalates. Kristen Chick is the Cairo correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor. She reports on the latest.   

What's Moving Into The PacMed Building?
Community college classroom space or view apartments? The public agency that owns the Pacific Medical Center atop Beacon Hill decided which one will occupy the art deco former military hospital on Tuesday night. The Pacific Hospital Preservation and Development Authority looked at proposals from Seattle Central Community College and a Miami-based developer. We talk with PHPDA executive director Rosemary Aragon.

Re-Thinking Conservation
For much of its existence The Nature Conservancy has bought acres upon acres of land to protect it from human development. Peter Kareiva, the chief scientist for The Nature Conservancy, believes a different philosophy is needed in order to deal with the “Age of Man.” He explains his conservation ideas and what a new study on climate change and nature can tell us about resilient environments.