kids and parenting | KUOW News and Information

kids and parenting

Dr. Jodi Jackson has worked for years to address infant mortality in Kansas. Often, that means she is treating newborns in a high-tech neonatal intensive care unit with sophisticated equipment whirring and beeping. That is exactly the wrong place for an infant like Lili.

Lili's mother, Victoria, used heroin for the first two-thirds of her pregnancy and hated herself for it. (NPR is using her first name only, because she has used illegal drugs.)

As students prepare to go back to school, more and more parents are thinking about school safety. A recent poll found 34 percent of parents fear for their child's physical safety at school. That's almost triple the number of parents from 2013.

Updated at 4:33 p.m. ET

A long-awaited grand jury investigation into clergy sexual abuse in Pennsylvania was released Tuesday in an interim redacted form. The report detailed decades of alleged misconduct and cover-ups in six of the state's eight Roman Catholic dioceses.

Photo of poet Diana Khoi Nguyen (left) and her family. The negative space in the foreground used to be an image of her brother Oliver, who sliced himself out of the photos with a utility knife. Oliver would go on to commit suicide.
Courtesy Diana Khoi Nguyen.

Denver poet Diana Khoi Nguyen's family is haunted by bees. 

It's easier for them to speak about the bees than it is to speak about her brother's suicide. But in her new book of poems, "Ghost Of," Diana is talking.

Ronit Feinglass Plank.
KUOW Photo/Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

If you've seen the Netflix documentary series "Wild Wild Country," you might have been watching wide-eyed at the followers of a cult that turned to assassination and poisoning. Memoirist Ronit Feinglass Plank, however, was watching for something different: her mother.


Editor's Note: This story contains graphic language.

A former worker at a shelter for immigrant youths in Arizona has been accused of molesting eight teenage boys over a nearly yearlong period at the facility, according to federal records cited by nonprofit news site ProPublica.

One of the halls at juvenile detention in Seattle. There are 212 beds but less than a quarter of those beds are used.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

King County wants your feedback on its efforts to jail fewer young people.

Milee Ballweg, 20, sits on the steps of a University District church where she sleeps just after 5 a.m. on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Nostalgia thrives on the Ave.

That’s University Way Northeast to cartographers, a street that pounds with construction and smells of $6.99 Thai lunch specials and bus exhaust.

Heading May Be Riskier For Female Soccer Players Than Males

Jul 31, 2018

The first rule of soccer is pretty obvious: don't use your hands. But soccer's signature move, heading the ball, can cause a detectable impact on players' brains. And according to a study published Tuesday in Radiology, female players are more sensitive to the impact than males.

When Cayti Kane delivered a baby boy via cesarean section last year, her team of doctors was prepared.

Kane had been diagnosed with placenta accreta, a condition that increased the likelihood of a dangerous hemorrhage during delivery. When that happened, she had an emergency hysterectomy. Kane and her son went home healthy.

A woman holds a sign asking "Where are the children?" at the Stop Separating Immigrant Families Press Conference and Rally in Chicago on June 5th, 2018.
Flickr Photo/Charles Edward Miller (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/JifDxM

Today is the deadline for the Trump administration to finish reunifying families it separated at the border. Meghan Casey of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project is an advocate whose client has not yet been reunited with her child, and has been tracking the numbers of families impacted in Washington State.

Pedraam Faridjoo of Kensington, Md., is spending his summer volunteering and traveling. Ryan Abshire from Carmel, Ind., is using the time to be with his family. Meme Etheridge of St. Simons Island, Ga., is attending a music camp where she plays percussion.

What do they all have in common? They're teenagers, and they are not working summer jobs.

A summer job, like lifeguarding or scooping ice cream, used to be a rite of passage for teens. Thirty years ago, nearly two-thirds of U.S. teenagers worked summer jobs. Twenty years ago, more than half of them did.

The U.S. government is racing to meet Thursday's court-ordered deadline to reunite migrant families who were separated at the border to discourage other illegal crossings. But the government has acknowledged many parents won't be able to rejoin their children. And for those parents who do get to be with their children again, the future is uncertain.

Avoid heating food in plastic, especially those with recycling codes 3, 6 and 7.
Wikimedia Commons, User Z22 http://bit.ly/2OiW387

Pediatricians are urging Congress to give the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authority to collect more data  on chemicals in food.

A new report by the American Academy of Pediatrics says synthetic chemicals used as additives and in food packaging are harmful to kids.

Bill Radke, Katie Anthony, and Ronit Feinglass Plank.
KUOW Photo/Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

Imagine, if you will, a stadium. (It's built by the patriarchy.) There are people who play the game within its walls. There are people trying to burn it down. And then there are others who have excused themselves from the arena in order to build their own.

Katie Anthony and Ronit Feinglass Plank are two of those refuseniks, who are instead making their own media game. They cohost the podcast Mouthy Messy Mandatory, as well as the new show Smart Mouth with The Young Turks.

Rates of anxiety and depression among teens in the U.S. have been rising for years. According to one study, nearly one in three adolescents (ages 13-18) now meets the criteria for an anxiety disorder, and in the latest results from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 32 percent of teens reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness.

Most teens today own a smartphone and go online every day, and about a quarter of them use the internet "almost constantly," according to a 2015 report by the Pew Research Center.

Now a study published Tuesday in JAMA suggests that such frequent use of digital media by adolescents might increase their odds of developing symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Kids These Days: Studying Post-Millennial Stereotypes

Jul 12, 2018

Kids these days, right? 

Martin Monto is skeptical. 

Monto, a sociology professor at the University of Portland, researches the high school and college student age group as well as recent college graduates — a generation sometimes referred to as the iGeneration or post-Millennials. Monto’s research challenges stereotypes about this generation.

What first interested Monto in the topic was a student who approached him interested in studying stereotypes about “hookup culture.”

It’s the agony of modern day parents: how to find and afford decent child care. This has become such a problem, the Washington Legislature has created a task force to tackle the issue.

Hands hold a DNA molecule whose bars have been formed into a cage.
Flickr Photo/thierry erhmann (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4i3QFK

Late last month, a federal judge in San Diego gave the Trump administration two weeks to reunite children under five with their parents, after immigration officials separated them at the border as part of a deterrence policy.

The problem? Records weren't kept, or in some cases had been destroyed. The solution, according to the administration: DNA testing of the children and their purported parents, which has many concerned about the ethical implications.

Immigrant families seeking asylum walk to a respite center after they were processed and released by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Friday, June 29, 2018, in McAllen, Texas.
AP Photo/Eric Gay

A mom and her 7-year-old son traveled to the U.S. from Guatemala. She is currently at the federal detention in SeaTac. This is her story, as told to Liz Jones. Translated from Spanish.

A federal employee walks past cribs inside of the barracks of a family detention center in Artesia, New Mexico, for those crossing the border. This photo is from 2014, when attorney Danielle Rosché volunteered there.
AP Photo/Juan Carlos Llorca, File

Family detention — two words that still haunt Danielle Rosché, an immigration attorney.

A division of the American Library Association voted unanimously Saturday to strip Laura Ingalls Wilder's name from a major children's literature award over concerns about how the author referred to Native Americans and blacks.

The Association for Library Service to Children says the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award will now be known as the Children's Literature Legacy Award.

Krysta Walia performed this reading at Tasveer's Yoni Ki Baat 2018.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

“On this day, May 31, 1998, the Skagit County Juvenile Court finds the child minor, Krysta Walia, guilty of the charges of disorderly conduct and truancy,” the judge said. “If the above-named child is absent from school again without an approved excuse, any deputy sheriff, police officer, or school official can make an arrest and take the child into custody without a warrant.”

As the other kids cry inconsolably on an audio recording of migrant children, 6-year-old Alison Jimena Valencia Madrid can be heard pleading for someone to call her aunt — reciting the number in Spanish.

Jimena is from El Salvador, and had just crossed into the U.S. before she was detained and separated from her mother.

"For the last 14 years I had been a stay at home mom and a soccer mom of three kids," says Lori Alhadeff. "On Valentine's Day my daughter was brutally shot down and murdered and I became a school safety activist."

That day at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, when a 19-year-old former student killed Alyssa Alhadeff and 16 other people, changed many lives.

And it pushed the question of school safety once again to the front and center.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Trump administration officials recently retreated on a policy to separate families at the border. Some have blamed past administrations for the stories of chaotic separations and traumatized children; others have pointed to Congress. And then one official claimed divine authority on the matter.


Updated at 7:55 p.m. ET

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is continuing to defend the Trump administration's controversial "zero tolerance" policy that results in separating children from their parents who enter the U.S. illegally.

Nielsen appeared at the White House press briefing on Monday, falsely blaming Democrats for the current crisis and arguing that the impetus is on Congress to pass a law to close legal loopholes.

Ben Zimmerman lives in a suburb of Chicago. Like a lot of 9-year-olds, he's fond of YouTube, Roblox, and Minecraft.

And, like a lot of parents, his mom and dad wanted to make sure Ben wasn't spending too much time on those activities. They tried to use Google's "Family Link" parental control software to limit screen time for Ben and his older sister, Claudia.

The number of men in the United States who are full-time, stay-at-home parents has risen steadily in recent decades, from maybe a million or so in 1984, according to a Pew Research Center estimate, to roughly double that in 2014.

That's still much smaller than the number of stay-at-home moms, of course, and many of the challenges these dads face are universal to parenting.

Pages