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politics

"Hearing it changed everything for me," former White House aide Omarosa Manigault Newman told NPR on Friday.

Manigault Newman was referring to what she calls the "N-word tape" — a long-rumored but never surfaced tape of Donald Trump on the set of The Apprentice allegedly using the racial slur. In her interview with NPR's Rachel Martin, Manigault Newman claims to have heard the tape and heard Trump using that slur on the tape.

But that's not what it says in her tell-all book, Unhinged, due out on Tuesday.

A voter returns a ballot in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood on Tuesday, August 1, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Tuesday is primary day in Washington state. So what kind of voter are you? Are you driven by the issues or by your emotions?

KUOW's Angela King talked with Assunta Ng, publisher of Northwest Asian Weekly, about her recent post on nine specific voting behaviors that many of us are guilty of.

A ballot drop box in Seattle
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Maria Cantwell, Dave Reichert's old seat, and big money: Kim Malcolm talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about what to watch for in Washington's August primary election.

A Portland Police Bureau officer controlling the crowd at a protest on Saturday, August 4th, 2018.
OPB Photo/Ericka Cruz Guevarra

The sound of flashbangs and smoke grenades echoed through the streets of downtown Portland Saturday during a protest held by the Proud Boys and Patriot Prayer. The groups clashed with members of Antifa, who were primarily on the receiving end of police force.


With less than a week until the primary election in his district, Republican state Rep. Matt Manweller has released a video accusing his employer—Central Washington University (CWU)—of pursuing a partisan-driven investigation into his workplace conduct.

A woman holds a sign asking "Where are the children?" at the Stop Separating Immigrant Families Press Conference and Rally in Chicago on June 5th, 2018.
Flickr Photo/Charles Edward Miller (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/JifDxM

Today is the deadline for the Trump administration to finish reunifying families it separated at the border. Meghan Casey of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project is an advocate whose client has not yet been reunited with her child, and has been tracking the numbers of families impacted in Washington State.

Flickr Photo/Renee Silverman

Bill Radke talks to State Senator Mike Padden and State Representative Roger Goodman about what they believe are the best solutions to reducing drunk driving deaths. Senator Padden supports toughening the laws, by making three DUI convictions, rather than four, equal a felony. Representative Goodman supports roadside checkpoints and technology-based solutions like ignition interlock devices.

A commemorative coin by the National Rifle Association.
Flickr Photo/Michael Tefft (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6KFkWN

Gun rights and Russian meddling collided last week, when Russian national Maria Butina was arrested on charges of being an unregistered foreign agent - that is, a spy.


Academic researchers will soon have access to a vast amount of Facebook's user data.
Flickr Photo/Andrew Feinberg (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4xvBtj

Facebook is sharing its user data with an external research group, which will mine it for details about how people use the site.

Sound familiar?


Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Kim Malcolm talks with U.S. Sen. Patty Murray about her opposition to Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Hands hold a DNA molecule whose bars have been formed into a cage.
Flickr Photo/thierry erhmann (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4i3QFK

Late last month, a federal judge in San Diego gave the Trump administration two weeks to reunite children under five with their parents, after immigration officials separated them at the border as part of a deterrence policy.

The problem? Records weren't kept, or in some cases had been destroyed. The solution, according to the administration: DNA testing of the children and their purported parents, which has many concerned about the ethical implications.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

With just hours to go before the official announcement, President Trump has made a decision on his pick for the next Supreme Court justice, a source close to the decision-making process tells NPR's Mara Liasson.

But there is still no indication which of the four finalists it will be.

As of Monday morning, Trump was still deciding among Judges Thomas Hardiman, Brett Kavanaugh, Raymond Kethledge and Amy Coney Barrett.

Ben Rhodes at the Seattle Public Library Central Library
KUOW Photo/John O'Brien

Ben Rhodes was a 24-year-old aspiring writer living in New York on 9/11. What happened that day made him want to be part of the response.  As you’ll hear in this talk, when his visit to an Army recruiter didn’t pan out, he looked for a way to get involved politically. 

Updated at 6:01 p.m. ET

Scott Pruitt will no longer lead the Environmental Protection Agency, President Trump announced Thursday afternoon via Twitter.

"I have accepted the resignation of Scott Pruitt," Trump tweeted. "Within the Agency Scott has done an outstanding job, and I will always be thankful to him for this," Trump also wrote.

Activists in two separate protests against the Trump administration's immigration policies were arrested at the Statue of Liberty on Wednesday — one group unfurling a banner calling for the abolition of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, while in another act of defiance, a woman climbed the statue's base to protest immigrant family separations.

Terrance Hayes.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

"In a second I'll tell you how little writing rescues." That promise, from the opening poem of Terrance Hayes' "American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin", is only partially kept. 

The poems in the book are in constant motion. They shuttle back and forth between Emmett Till and Maxine Waters, slavery and hip hop, the nation's future and the past it can't bear to look at. 

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has electrified Democratic Party activists, not only by pulling off a major political upset in New York's 14th Congressional District primary this week but with her progressive politics, working-class roots, and background as a Latina.

Flickr Photo/SP8254 (CC BY-NC-ND)

In light of this month’s finding in favor of the Colorado baker who refused to make a cake for a same-sex wedding, Supreme Court watchers anticipated a similar decision in the case of Arlene’s Flowers in Richland.

That expectation was dashed, as the court declined to rule on the case. Instead, they sent it back to the Washington State Supreme Court to reconsider.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Trump administration officials recently retreated on a policy to separate families at the border. Some have blamed past administrations for the stories of chaotic separations and traumatized children; others have pointed to Congress. And then one official claimed divine authority on the matter.


This essay isn't about spin, or splitting hairs, or differing opinions.

This involves a reality check about our expectations of the people who act in our name. About credibility at the highest levels of our government. About people whose words are heard abroad as speaking for our nation. About the public and the media that try, however imperfectly, to serve it.

Eula Scott Bynoe Jeannie Yandel
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Yes, your workplace is sexist.

Three months ago the students from South Florida established themselves as a potent force in the gun debate with the March For Our Lives rally. This summer they're hitting the road with a new mission: turn the wave of young activism they helped spark into an energized voting bloc for the November mid-term elections.

At the annual end-of-year peace march in Chicago, organized by St. Sabina Catholic Church, Grammy-winners Chance the Rapper and Jennifer Hudson, along with former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, joined the Parkland survivors to launch a bus tour called Road to Change.

Updated, 10:15 p.m. ET

On the same day that that President Trump's former campaign chairman was sent to jail, Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani floated the idea that special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation could be "cleaned up" with presidential pardons.

"When the whole thing is over, things might get cleaned up with some presidential pardons," Giuliani told the New York Daily News on Friday.

The Seattle City Council brought the short-lived "head tax" into the world last month — and last Tuesday, the council proved that it could take it out too.

Updated at 10:25 p.m. ET

Leaving the Group of Seven Summit for Singapore, President Trump tweeted that he has instructed U.S. representatives to not endorse a joint communique issued by the G-7 leaders.

The president tweeted "Based on Justin's false statements at his news conference, and the fact that Canada is charging massive Tariffs to our U.S. farmers, workers and companies, I have instructed our U.S. Reps not to endorse the Communique as we look at Tariffs on automobiles flooding the U.S. Market!"

The Trump administration's policy of separating families who are detained after illegally crossing the Southern border has become a lightning rod for the White House's critics.

Hundreds of children have already been separated from their parents since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy in May — though the practice has been going on for at least several months.

Comedian Dave Chappelle was the star attraction at a campaign event in suburban Washington on Friday, where he took part in a rally for longtime friend and Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ben Jealous.

"So you know, I'm out of my element," the stand-up comic told an enthusiastic crowd at Olde Towne Inn in Largo, Md., a short drive from Washington, D.C. "You know politics has never been my thing."

The Trump administration is refusing to defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, essentially arguing that federal courts should find the health law's protections for people with pre-existing conditions unconstitutional.

The federal lawsuit hinges on the ACA's individual mandate, or the requirement to get health coverage or pay a penalty. The mandate has long been a sticking point for conservatives, who argue that the government should not be telling individuals what coverage they must have.

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