sexual assault and harassment | KUOW News and Information

sexual assault and harassment

Standing Up For Victims Of Revenge Porn

Dec 13, 2016

“The evolution of technology requires an evolution of laws,” says Carrie Goldberg (@cagoldberglaw), a lawyer who is devoting much of her practice to defend victims of online assaults. Goldberg, whose practice is in New York, is a leader in the new field of sexual privacy.

A federal jury has found that Rolling Stone, a reporter and the magazine's publisher are liable in a defamation lawsuit over a retracted article about an alleged rape at the University of Virginia.

The trial centered on a November 2014 piece by reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely that told the story of a student, identified as "Jackie," who said she was brutally gang raped at a fraternity party in 2012.

Mona Lee Locke in the KUOW studios
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Mona Lee Locke wrote this essay on Facebook:  

I am appalled that this election has become the biggest reality show of our country's recent history. In fact, I am so sick to my stomach that I have to speak out.

Elizabeth Allen was at a happy hour for a San Francisco tech firm a couple of years ago, when a co-worker started forcing himself on her and the few other women at the party — again and again.

He was "giving us lots of hugs," Allen says, "trying to kiss me a few times; he grabbed my butt a couple of times." The women were outnumbered by men, some of whom looked on, bemused, as the women tried to signal their distress.

One staple in just about every sexual assault prevention program is the video vignette. It's usually a play-acted scenario used to teach students what crosses the line.

Now, the videotape of GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump bragging about groping and kissing women is quickly becoming the classic real-life case study.

New allegations that he inappropriately touched and groped women are "vicious" as well as "totally, absolutely false," Donald Trump said Thursday at a campaign rally.

Trump made the comments at a planned rally in West Palm Beach, Fla., his first time speaking publicly since the New York Times and other publications reported assault allegations from various women.

He said the claims were thrown at him by "the Clinton machine," the New York Times and other news outlets.

Updated Dec. 6, 2017, at 11:35 a.m. ET.

For the first time, President Trump publicly addressed allegations against Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore on Tuesday. The president defended Moore, who is accused of making unwanted sexual advances toward teenage girls as young as 14 when he was in his 30s.

"Let me just tell you, Roy Moore denies it," Trump said. "That's all I can say. He denies it. And by the way, he totally denies it."

On Friday, writer Kelly Oxford shared the story of the first time she was sexually assaulted. She was 12, she said, when a man on a city bus grabbed her genitals and smiled.

She used the same word that Republican candidate Donald Trump used in a recording where he talked about doing things to women.

"Women: tweet me your first assaults," Oxford said: "they aren't just stats."

One week after a House panel highlighted sexual harassment claims at Yosemite National Park and elsewhere in the National Park Service, the superintendent of Yosemite, Don Neubacher is stepping down, the agency says.

According to NPS regional spokesman Andrew Munoz, the agency "acted to move Don Neubacher from his role" leading the park to protect the integrity of its investigation into allegations of a hostile work environment at Yosemite.

Kim Malcolm talks with Capt. Deanna Nollette about the rise in sexual assault cases being reported to the Seattle Police Department. Reported cases are up 55 percent during the first nine months of 2016 compared to the same time period last year. Nollette supervises the Special Victims Unit at SPD.

Editor's Note: Names of sexual assault victims have been changed in this story, to protect their privacy.

Haley woke up early one morning in June 2014. She had been out with a few friends at a bar in Ashland, Ore., the night before, and she felt safest going home with them rather than walking home alone.

"It turns out," she said, "the creeper that I had to be afraid of was in my circle of friends."

Women and girls in Oregon are more likely to be survivors of sexual violence, and have the highest incidence of reported depression in the country, according to a report released Wednesday on the status of women in the state.

Trigger warnings, the heads-up that college professors give to students to let them know disturbing content is coming, have gotten a lot of attention as the school year has unfolded. When a University of Chicago dean wrote a letter to incoming freshmen this fall rejecting the idea of those warnings, it sparked a nationwide debate on the use of advisories in the classroom.

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Times reporter Joseph O'Sullivan about his investigation into how an incorrect sentencing form shaved off community supervision time for some sex offenders in  Washington. In 2010, officials discovered the error, but the problem wasn't fixed until last January.

Three months after he received a lenient punishment for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman at Stanford University, Brock Turner left the Santa Clara County Main Jail on Friday morning. He served half of a six-month sentence that drew a furious public response.

It sounds like a crazy idea. Convince a survivor of sexual assault to tell her story by filming herself with a fire-breathing dragon imposed on her face.

That's what Indian journalist Yusuf Omar did. He discovered that Snapchat, a mobile app that allows users to create photo or video "stories" that disappear after 24 hours, can be used to document a victim's first-person account while obscuring his or her identities.

Its built-in "filters" — illustrated or animated digital overlays — can transform a subject's face into anything from a flower child to a puppy.

The California Assembly unanimously passed a measure that requires a prison sentence for anyone convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious person.

Roger Ailes, the CEO and chairman of Fox News, is stepping down from his role. Rupert Murdoch will be taking over as chairman and acting CEO.

Ailes "has resigned from his role effective immediately," according to a statement from parent company 21st Century Fox.

The Murdoch family is moving to oust the chairman of Fox News Channel after multiple women have accused him of sexual harassment, NPR's David Folkenflik reports.

Roger Ailes is the co-founder, chairman and CEO of the news channel. Multiple sources at Fox News tell David that the Murdochs, who are controlling owners of parent company 21st Century Fox, are moving to push Ailes out of his prominent, powerful role.

21st Century Fox released this statement: "Roger is at work. The review is ongoing. The only agreement that is in place is his existing employment agreement."

The past few days may mark the moment at which the interests of Fox News and its charismatic chairman, Roger Ailes, diverge from those of its parent company, 21st Century Fox, and the Murdoch family that controls it.

Dr. Michael Katze of the University of Washington microbiology department.
University of Washington

Kim Malcolm talks with Buzzfeed News reporter Azeen Ghorayshi about the sexual harassment allegations against University of Washington microbiology professor Dr. Michael Katze.


A Tennessee jury has found former Vanderbilt football player Brandon Vandenburg guilty of multiple counts of aggravated rape and aggravated sexual battery in a case that stems from the 2013 gang rape of a woman he had been dating.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about British Columbia Premier Christy Clark speaking out about her experience with sexual violence. Clark is saying it's time to break the silence. 

The California judge who issued what critics called a lenient sentence to a former Stanford University swimmer convicted of sexual assault has been removed from hearing an unrelated sexual assault case.

A Banksy piece in Boston. Photo taken in 2010.
FLICKR PHOTO/CHRIS DEVERS HTTP://BIT.LY/1SIPWMB (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

It started with a woman named Deja Stwalley, who claimed to be a porn recruiter. 

This recruiter reached out to young women, ages 19 and 20.  

When the U.S. government released its tally of sexual violence cases on college campuses under review in 2014, Stanford wasn't on the list. But in the new list that's out this month, Stanford has the most cases, with five.

The notorious assault that's been making headlines is not among the cases under federal review.

The father of Brock Turner, who was sentenced last week for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman at Stanford University, reportedly says his son is being punished for "20 minutes of action."

But others, including the Santa Clara District Attorney Jeff Rosen, say Turner, who was a top swimmer at Stanford, got off easy when he was sentenced to six months in county jail and three years' probation. Turner was convicted in March on three felony counts. Prosecutors had sought a sentence of six years in prison.

Courtesy of Jeff Emtman

Bill Radke speaks with Bethany Denton and Jeff Emtman about their story about the sexually violent predators who reside in the special commitment center on McNeil Island in Washington state.

Renewed controversy over heavy American military presence on the Japanese island of Okinawa swirled as President Obama arrived in Japan for the G7 summit. Just a week earlier, a former U.S. Marine allegedly raped and killed a local Okinawa woman, triggering protests on the island.

A judge in Pennsylvania ruled Tuesday that there is sufficient evidence for a sexual assault case against comedian Bill Cosby to move to trial.

The arraignment is set for July, Bobby Allyn of member station WHYY reports.

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