During Seattle's prohibition years in the 1920s, Roy Olmstead became one of the largest and most successful bootleggers in King County. 
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During Seattle's prohibition years in the 1920s, Roy Olmstead became one of the largest and most successful bootleggers in King County.
Credit: Courtesy of Museum of History & Industry, Seattle (MOHAI)

This king of bootleggers was one of Seattle's biggest employers

Roy Olmstead was a former cop who became the most successful bootlegger in the country in the 1920s. He was considered one-part hero, one-part criminal.

Learn about his wild story on this SoundQs episode where we take over KUOW's daily show, The Record.

On this special episode of SoundQs we also look at how the Burke Museum is grappling with its colonial past and re-imagining its relationship with Native American artists. This segment includes artist Ryan Feddersen, a member of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Okanogan /Arrow Lakes).

Plus! A tree expert helps us answer some of the many questions we get from SoundQs listeners about the local trees, along with a look at what kinds of things stress trees out.

Listen to the episode by clicking the play button above or on your favorite podcast app. SoundQs is a weekly podcast where our KUOW reporters tackle questions submitted by our listeners.

Have a question about the Seattle region for us to answer? Drop it here:

This episode featured the songs: “Feeling Good” by Upstate, “Indigo Hope” by Tolo, “Nocturne” by Jacob Montague, “On My Knees” by Seryn, “Your Flag” by Human Pyramids, and “With Light” by Analog Heart. There is also music composed by Michael Parker.