As viewers, what's our responsibility to the subjects in images of violence?
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As viewers, what's our responsibility to the subjects in images of violence?

When the media shows us dead bodies, what do we see?

How the corpses we show create a hierarchy of grief. A chat about the recent SPD exit interviews. Would you eat fake chicken nuggets? (What if you didn’t know they were fake?) And the glamorous origins of Seattle’s Norwegian festival.

Listen to the full show by clicking the play button above, or check out one of the show’s segments below. You can also subscribe to The Record on your favorite podcast app.

Sarah Sentilles, Draw Your Weapons

There are many bodies that have been front page news in the last few years: Aylan Curdi. Michael Brown. Philando Castile. But there are only some bodies we see in death: mostly black and brown and foreign, or somehow other. Sarah Sentilles is the author of Draw Your Weapons. She says we’re not great viewers of photos – that our job is to take action, not to look away.

SPD Exodus

At least 18 cops have left the Seattle Police Department for King County or Tacoma agencies in the past year. They’re not leaving law enforcement in general – they just no longer want to work here. City Councilmember Lorena González and Former Seattle Police Chief Norm Stamper joined Bill Radke to talk about why.

Fake chicken nuggets?

Two weeks ago, a company called Beyond Meat went public. Their product? A plant-based alternative to hamburgers. Their stock price? Has gone from $25 to $92 since their IPO. There’s a local company in the plant-based game as well; it’s called Seattle Food Tech. Christie Lagally is its CEO; she spoke with Marcie Sillman about her dreams for the future of meat-free chicken nuggets.

Syttende Mai

Tomorrow is the 17th of May – Syttende Mai in Norwegian. And every year, Seattleites don their Viking helmets, grab their dragon boats, and head to Ballard to celebrate Norwegian Constitution Day. It’s the biggest Syttende Mai celebration outside of Norway; we spoke to Eric Nelson of the Nordic Museum about how the party got started.