skip to main content
Coronavirus In Seattle
caption: Flowers, notes and pictures line the entrance of Leschi Market in memory of co-owner Steve Shulman on Monday, March 23, 2020, in Seattle. Shulman passed away on March 18 after testing positive for the coronavirus. 
    Slideshow Icon 2 slides
Enlarge Icon
Flowers, notes and pictures line the entrance of Leschi Market in memory of co-owner Steve Shulman on Monday, March 23, 2020, in Seattle. Shulman passed away on March 18 after testing positive for the coronavirus.
Credit: KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Coronavirus hits close to home for this Seattle community

A beloved grocer and community member of Seattle’s Leschi neighborhood has died from coronavirus.

Steve Shulman, 67, co-owner of Leschi Market, passed away March 18.

Residents have been leaving flowers and notes by the store’s entrance. Leschi Market has been a neighborhood fixture since the 1940’s. Steve Shulman had been working there since he was a teenager. One of the store’s popular offerings is the hot roast prime rib served every Friday and Saturday afternoon.

His nephew, Yousef Shulman, described his uncle as a man with a big heart. “He was like a big teddy bear,” Shulman said. “You wouldn’t think of him that way, but he would do anything for anybody.”

Shulman was known for supporting various causes, whether it was fundraising for community councils and senior centers, or supporting public safety programs. But the store was his life.

“He was here all the time and he loved it. This was where he was happy and this was where he wanted to be and he enjoyed it.”

Shulman said his uncle fell down the stairs on March 12 and was taken to the hospital. There doctors found a spot on his lung that was determined it was COVID-19. He was placed on ventilator in the ICU, in quarantine. He died within days.

During the whole time, no one was able to visit him or to be there when he took his last breath.

“Nobody should have to die alone. I know the doctors were there but nobody should have to die without a loved one.”

Shulman says after his uncle’s death his family was able to provide a small, minimal service. But when the time’s right, they’re planning a celebration to honor him.