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caption: People wait in a long line to receive a food bank donation at the Barclays Center on May 15 in Brooklyn, N.Y. Across the country, cities and towns are dealing with the highest unemployment rates since the Great Depression.
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People wait in a long line to receive a food bank donation at the Barclays Center on May 15 in Brooklyn, N.Y. Across the country, cities and towns are dealing with the highest unemployment rates since the Great Depression.
Credit: Getty Images

Food insecurity rates in King County nearly double as pandemic continues

One in 10 residents in King County does not have enough food to eat, according to a new report.

Food insecurity, or not having enough food, has been an issue, even before the pandemic. But restrictions to slow the spread of Covid-19 have made it worse.

The rate of food insecurity in King County nearly doubled, according to the report produced by Public Health - Seattle & King County. People of color have been especially hit hard, said Elizabeth Kimball, who oversees the county’s food security program.

“People who identify as Black, Indigenous, and other people of color are experiencing food insecurity worse than our white community.”

Between April and May this year, food assistance was the second most requested service, after housing needs.

“The primary cause is income, people not being able to afford to buy groceries.”

Another cause is fear—some people didn’t want to risk their health to get groceries. The county is using federal funds to help non-profits provide foods for communities in need. The correct number is one in 1. This

Correction:

A previous version incorrectly stated one in four residents in King County does not have enough food to eat. The correct number is one in 10. This article has been updated to reflect the accurate information.

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