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caption: These homes were originally an army camp, and were converted to house farmworkers. Seattle commercial photographer Irwin Nash had to climb a water tower and run the Leica with one hand, while holding on to the ladder with the other, to get these aerial photographs.
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These homes were originally an army camp, and were converted to house farmworkers. Seattle commercial photographer Irwin Nash had to climb a water tower and run the Leica with one hand, while holding on to the ladder with the other, to get these aerial photographs.
Credit: KUOW / Alec Cowan

Hear it again: A picture is worth a thousand words

This Thanksgiving week we’re revisiting some of our best stories of the year so far.

Today, we’re looking back on our favorite segments about images and the stories they tell about us.

You might be going to a movie theater this week to see "Black Panther: Wakanda Forever," one of the most anticipated movies of the year. One of the things that makes the Black Panther universe so immersive is its intricate costumes.

Back in August, KUOW Arts and Culture reporter Mike Davis went to see some of the outfits up close at the Museum of Pop Culture at Seattle Center. Davis also spoke with the artist who dreamed up those iconic costumes, academy-award-winning designer Ruth E. Carter.

Their conversation touched on the generational impacts of Carter’s work, from the ancestral homages in "Black Panther" to the sneaker culture influences of "Do the Right Thing."

You can listen and read the original story here.

'It's an ongoing celebration:' Ruth E. Carter on the cultural impact of her Afrofuturistic costume designs

In the 1990s, Washington State University purchased a collection of 10,000 photographs from Seattle commercial photographer Irwin Nash.

This collection tells the story of Yakima Valley farmworkers – their hopes, their struggles, and their everyday lives.

At the time, the university didn’t know who or what many of these photos depicted. But in the years since, thanks to community efforts and a Facebook group, the history of this era is being filled in, photo by photo.

In January, Soundside producer Alec Cowan took a trip out to Pullman to see the collection up close.

You can listen and read the original story here.

Decades later, this photo collection is filling in the corners of Washington's immigrant history