skip to main content

Clare McGrane

Podcast Producer

About

Clare produces Seattle Now, KUOW's news podcast. She crafts episodes that give listeners a timely window into stories from around the Seattle area. Her favorite episodes to make include sound-rich collaborations with local reporters, field trips to vibrant places around the Puget Sound, and conversations about pop culture. She also reports stories for the show and appears "on air" as a guest. She has extensive experience covering health stories, including coverage of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Previously, Clare was KUOW's emerging platforms producer, leading strategy and product development for digital audio channels including smart speakers, algorithmic content curators like NPR One and podcasts. Before joining KUOW, she covered health technology and life sciences at GeekWire. Clare is a University of Washington graduate with a dual degree in journalism and creative writing.

Location: Seattle

Languages: English

Pronouns: she/her

Podcasts

Stories

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Seattle teachers on the picket lines

    School was supposed to start yesterday. Instead of coming to classrooms full of students, Seattle public school teachers donned red shirts and took to the picket lines to strike. Teachers are striking for competitive pay, adequate classroom support, and a better teacher to student ratio for Special Education classrooms. In fact, Seattle's Special Education program has been a core issue at the bargaining table. We went to a few schools to talk with teachers and educators about why they are striking and the issues that are important to them.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Casual Friday with Jas Keimig and Andrew Walsh

    This week, some teachers and students started a new school year. Others are on still trying to negotiate labor agreements with districts. The rest of us are debating what it really means to “quiet quit” your job. And just in case you want to get judgy on the internet, Pumpkin Spice season is officially here. Cue the hot takes. We unpack it all with The Stranger’s Jas Keimig and podcast host Andrew Walsh.

  • Seattlenow Storyheader 1500x1000
    Seattle Now

    Here come the EVs. Are we ready?

    Governor Jay Inslee announced last week that Washington will follow California in banning sales of new gas-powered cars after 2035. But the charging station network for electric vehicles in the United States isn’t ready for prime time. The Biden administration wants to add 500,000 new charging stations by 2030. Washington state wants to be part of that revolution, but if you want or need to make a long-distance trip soon, you’ll face some challenges. We talked to Aaron Blank, who shared insights from his EV trip from LA to Seattle and back this summer. Then we reached out to Anna Lising, a senior policy advisor on energy to Governor Jay Inslee.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Why Harborview is turning away patients

    Harborview Medical Center is turning away all non-urgent patients, and has been for more than a week. The hospital is at 130 percent of its capacity. One big reason: staffing, both at the hospital and in other parts of the healthcare system. Dr. Steve Mitchell, medical director of Harborview's emergency department, explains what's going on and how the hospital is adapting. We also hear from nurse Nicole Johnson on burnout among frontline healthcare workers.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Turning nuclear waste into art

    Today we’re sharing an episode from KUOW’s new podcast, The Blue Suit. This week’s episode is about a local artist who was inspired by the clean up effort at Washington’s Hanford nuclear plant to create a new form of glass art. Subscribe to The Blue Suit in any podcast app to hear more episodes, or listen at kuow.org/podcasts/bluesuit

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Spokane is building back better (than Seattle)

    In news that will surprise no one, Seattle has a housing shortage. One solution is to get rid of single-family zoning and make it easier to build things like duplexes and triplexes. Seattle has rejected this idea a number of times, but all the way across the state, Spokane is embracing it. KUOW Joshua McNichols tells us how Spokane is approaching this issue differently, and what Seattle can learn from their experience.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Seattle's plan to hire 500 police officers

    Two years ago, the conversation in Seattle was all about defunding the Seattle Police Department, but things have changed. Mayor Bruce Harrell says SPD now has a staffing crisis. He’s proposing an ambitious plan to put millions into hiring 500 new police officers. KUOW reporter Amy Radil explains why the department has such a labor shortage and how Harrell's recruitment plan would work.

  • Seattle Now logo
    Seattle Now

    Saving local forests, with help from big business

    Earlier this month, a blockchain company based in Delaware struck the biggest carbon offset deal in history with the city of Issaquah. This kind of deal is a new frontier in both saving local forests and tackling climate change. We talked to Seattle Times environment reporter Lynda Mapes about how this all works back when the state of Washington announced they’re getting into this game. Today we’re revisiting that episode.