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The Blue Suit

Hosted and created by award-winning poet Shin Yu Pai, The Blue Suit is about commonplace objects and the people who transform them into something remarkable. From a Chinese-English dictionary passed from father to son to an old califone playing records left behind by Japanese Americans incarcerated during WWII, The Blue Suit will reexamine what gets elevated to heirloom status.

Tell us about your object

Do you have an object that is meaningful to you, personally, culturally, historically? Tell us your story and it might be featured in our live event on September 7, 2022. You can email us your story at engage@kuow.org or leave us a voicemail message at 1-206-221-1926.

Tell us your name, what your object is and why it’s important to you. Be sure to leave your contact information in case we need to get back in touch. The ideal objects will have transformed or changed you in a significant way and have a connection to a larger cultural history or experience.

Additional credits: Logo art by Melissa Takai. Music by Tomo Nakayama. Promo audio by Hans Twite.

Episodes

  • caption: Glass orbs glow in Etsuko Ichikawa's Poems of Broken Fireflies.

    A glassy gift shines a new path

    In a small clear box, Etsuko Ichikawa keeps a small piece of vitrified glass that was given to her on a tour of the Hanford nuclear site.

  • caption: Tomo and his favorite miso.

    A flavor creates harmony

    Tomo Nakayama usually puts his creative energy into his harmonious music. But when the pandemic hit, he found a new outlet: cooking.

  • caption: Anida Yoeu Ali, The Red Chador, Paris 2015 Performance.

    A garment unveils an identity

    A chador garment worn by some Muslim women is usually black. Not Anida Yoeu Ali's. Her chador is red and sparkly.

  • Blue_Suit_Horizontal.png

    Trailer: The Blue Suit

    In a world full of stuff, what is worth keeping? What do we treasure? Explore modern-day heirlooms with The Blue Suit, a new KUOW podcast hosted and created by PNW poet Shin Yu Pai.