Serena Williams (R) of the United States comforts Naomi Osaka (L) of Japan after Osaka won the Women's Singles finals match on Day Thirteen of the 2018 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 8, 2018 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.
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Serena Williams (R) of the United States comforts Naomi Osaka (L) of Japan after Osaka won the Women's Singles finals match on Day Thirteen of the 2018 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 8, 2018 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.
Credit: Getty Images/Chris Trotman

We’re so over women being dinged for showing emotion at work

When Serena Williams was penalized at the U.S. Open for throwing her racket and calling the umpire a thief, it got us thinking.

There was something all-too familiar about the exchange: Once again, a woman was being penalized for showing anger at work.

We got in touch with experts such as Anne Kreamer, author of the book "It’s Always Personal: Emotion In The New Workplace." We wanted to know: Is getting angry — or sad or happy or excited or irritated — at work really such a terrible thing? Is it even possible to not show emotion at work? And why are women and people of color penalized for emotions when white guys aren't?

“Emotion is integral to every single decision a human being makes during the course of their day," Kreamer said.

Just as we suspected.

One problem is, nobody’s really bothered to revisit whether our norms around work — all business, no personal — is realistic in the modern workplace. Short answer: Of course it isn't. Because that's never actually been the norm, nor should it be. The truth is, workplaces are better when people feel free to show a little emotion.

Listen to the full installment of this week's Battle Tactics For Your Sexist Workplace by clicking the play button above, or subscribe to the podcast on your favorite app.

This episode of Battle Tactics For Your Sexist Workplace was hosted by Eula Scott Bynoe and Jeannie Yandel. It was produced by Kyle Norris and edited by Caroline Chamberlain Gomez.